A Study In Movement

A Study In Movement

Commute #11 - shadows

Commute #10 - crossing

generalelectric:

GE engineers produced this model of a GEnx jet engine using an advanced 3-D printing technique called direct metal laser melting. Experts at GE Aviation’s Additive Development Center built the model, which measures about 1.5 inches long.
They first drafted the object with its moving parts in a digital design file, which guided a high-tech machine that fired a laser at a tray of metal powder. The laser melted layer upon layer of powder onto the growing model until it was complete. Its rotating parts were printed in an assembled state, so no fitting or welds were required.
This additive manufacturing method is producing a growing list of parts for numerous industries, making stronger components with less material waste that are impossible to create using traditional techniques.
If you’re a 3-D printing aficionado, check out GE’s Open Innovation competition, where we invite entrepreneurs, companies and institutions to offer their solutions to additive manufacturing challenges in design and production.

Oh… ya know. Just working on the future of Aviation.
generalelectric:

GE engineers produced this model of a GEnx jet engine using an advanced 3-D printing technique called direct metal laser melting. Experts at GE Aviation’s Additive Development Center built the model, which measures about 1.5 inches long.
They first drafted the object with its moving parts in a digital design file, which guided a high-tech machine that fired a laser at a tray of metal powder. The laser melted layer upon layer of powder onto the growing model until it was complete. Its rotating parts were printed in an assembled state, so no fitting or welds were required.
This additive manufacturing method is producing a growing list of parts for numerous industries, making stronger components with less material waste that are impossible to create using traditional techniques.
If you’re a 3-D printing aficionado, check out GE’s Open Innovation competition, where we invite entrepreneurs, companies and institutions to offer their solutions to additive manufacturing challenges in design and production.

Oh… ya know. Just working on the future of Aviation.

generalelectric:

GE engineers produced this model of a GEnx jet engine using an advanced 3-D printing technique called direct metal laser melting. Experts at GE Aviation’s Additive Development Center built the model, which measures about 1.5 inches long.

They first drafted the object with its moving parts in a digital design file, which guided a high-tech machine that fired a laser at a tray of metal powder. The laser melted layer upon layer of powder onto the growing model until it was complete. Its rotating parts were printed in an assembled state, so no fitting or welds were required.

This additive manufacturing method is producing a growing list of parts for numerous industries, making stronger components with less material waste that are impossible to create using traditional techniques.

If you’re a 3-D printing aficionado, check out GE’s Open Innovation competition, where we invite entrepreneurs, companies and institutions to offer their solutions to additive manufacturing challenges in design and production.

Oh… ya know. Just working on the future of Aviation.

Commute #8 - exits
Commute #8 - exits

Commute #8 - exits

Commute #9 - atmosphere

Commute #8 - exits

Commute #7 - in betweens

Commute #6 - En route

What the design process is really like.
What the design process is really like.

What the design process is really like.

Commute #5 - Lines